B&W, Rural, Urban Photography

My friend Didi S DubelyeW, a photographer and screenwriter, is always putting me onto new photoblogs, because she knows that I can spend time looking at images all day. One of Didi’s latest finds is Kay Westhue’s Fourteen Places to Eat, which features a lot of rural Indiana. "In my photos, I am trying to view a very familiar landscape and people
as an outsider, to show the uniqueness in the everyday that we take for
granted," says Kay. "Like a documentary photographer documenting the back yard, so
to speak." Kay in turn has links to some other great photoblogs.

I grew up in the American South, but the scenery outside my window is much more urban these days. Walker Evans has become more and more a favorite of mine; I love how he was able to skillfully shoot both the South and New York. (He once took this picture of a church in Beaufort, South Carolina, not way too far from where I grew up.)

File Magazine showcases photos of Times Square by John Aaron. Dave Beckerman also highlights New York, my favorite city in the world, on his photoblog. I love his confession on why he prefers shooting in black and white.

Black and white also seems well-suited to the city. New York, for me, will always be a city best described in black and white. It is simply more dramatic, perhaps romantic, in monochrome. And now for true confessions — in all the years I have been shooting — nearly 35 years — I have never shot a roll of color film. Never. Not once.

I shot some Ilford XP-2 outside my window today, so yes, I do like black and white. Unlike Dave, though, I do, in fact, usually do, shoot color (especially now that I have gone digital, and it is easy to convert color images), but there is a lot to what Dave says about photographing New York in black and white. Certainly, the photos of Berenice Abbott and Andreas Feininger are among the first to come to mind when you think of the city (not to forget Margaret Bourke-White’s photo of the Chrysler Building)?

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B&W, Rural, Urban Photography

My friend Didi S DubelyeW, a photographer and screenwriter, is always putting me onto new photoblogs, because she knows that I can spend time looking at images all day. One of Didi’s latest finds is Kay Westhue’s Fourteen Places to Eat, which features a lot of rural Indiana. "In my photos, I am trying to view a very familiar landscape and people
as an outsider, to show the uniqueness in the everyday that we take for
granted," says Kay. "Like a documentary photographer documenting the back yard, so
to speak." Kay in turn has links to some other great photoblogs.

I grew up in the American South, but the scenery outside my window is much more urban these days. Walker Evans has become more and more a favorite of mine; I love how he was able to skillfully shoot both the South and New York. (He once took this picture of a church in Beaufort, South Carolina, not way too far from where I grew up.)

File Magazine showcases photos of Times Square by John Aaron. Dave Beckerman also highlights New York, my favorite city in the world, on his photoblog. I love his confession on why he prefers shooting in black and white.

Black and white also seems well-suited to the city. New York, for me, will always be a city best described in black and white. It is simply more dramatic, perhaps romantic, in monochrome. And now for true confessions — in all the years I have been shooting — nearly 35 years — I have never shot a roll of color film. Never. Not once.

I shot some Ilford XP-2 outside my window today, so yes, I do like black and white. Unlike Dave, though, I do, in fact, usually do, shoot color (especially now that I have gone digital, and it is easy to convert color images), but there is a lot to what Dave says about photographing New York in black and white. Certainly, the photos of Berenice Abbott and Andreas Feininger are among the first to come to mind when you think of the city (not to forget Margaret Bourke-White’s photo of the Chrysler Building)?

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