Et Tu, Atlantic?

Fiction has been disappearing from the pages of the glossies (prestige magazines) for years. Then the New York Times Book Review announced that it was going to devote less space to discussing fiction. The latest salvo is the announcement that The Atlantic is going to stop publishing fiction on a monthly basis, according to The New York Times.

The Atlantic Monthly magazine, which in its nearly 150-year history was among the first to publish short works of fiction by Ernest Hemingway, Mark Twain, Henry James and Sue Miller, is eliminating the regular publication of fiction from its pages, according to a letter from the magazine’s editors in the May issue. The change, the editors say, is to allow for more space to be devoted to "long-form narrative reporting."

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Et Tu, Atlantic?

Fiction has been disappearing from the pages of the glossies (prestige magazines) for years. Then the New York Times Book Review announced that it was going to devote less space to discussing fiction. The latest salvo is the announcement that The Atlantic is going to stop publishing fiction on a monthly basis, according to The New York Times.

The Atlantic Monthly magazine, which in its nearly 150-year history was among the first to publish short works of fiction by Ernest Hemingway, Mark Twain, Henry James and Sue Miller, is eliminating the regular publication of fiction from its pages, according to a letter from the magazine’s editors in the May issue. The change, the editors say, is to allow for more space to be devoted to "long-form narrative reporting."

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2 responses to “Et Tu, Atlantic?

  1. I don’t blame them. The short story is dead. The question is, what killed it? MFA programs? The NEA? Television?

    Because it sure as hell isn’t the Internet.

    f

  2. Pingback: fredschoeneman.com

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